Archives for the month of: April, 2014
The Yellow Emperor transmits books to Léi Gōng, from Wellcomeimages.org

The Yellow Emperor transmits books to Léi Gōng, from Wellcomeimages.org

“There are no incurable diseases, only incurable people.” (Yellow Emperor’s Classic, Sù Wèn, Chapter 14)

Cave, from hcn.org

Cave, from hcn.org

Old Chinese house, from independentwritersstudio.com

Old Chinese house, from independentwritersstudio.com

I live in a small community on a mountain. Needless to say there are not a lot of acupuncturists up here. In China it would be typical to find many more. I imagine them meditating in caves like sages, far away from congested cities, though there are lots in dense areas too. I frequently hear the same refrain when I introduce myself, “Oh, I tried that! Acupuncture didn’t work.”

Chinese medicine, like any time-tested medical system, treats almost any symptom not requiring surgery in the United States. Legally an acupuncturist cannot treat any illness, only their symptoms, which make us sound coy in articles like this. Western medicine is a complete system too although I have not heard anyone say, “I saw the doctor and it didn’t work so Western medicine has failed me.” Most people with an illness seek out another doctor because they know that proficiency varies greatly in the profession.

Chinese medicine is no different. One acupuncturist does not necessarily have the skills of another. I had a patient with hyperthyroidism, who could not take the toxic Western medication because her liver was being damaged. Her endocrinologist was very excited by her response to acupuncture because the hyperthyroidism went away. The doctor was ready to start referring all her patients too sensitive for the drugs to see acupuncturists. Her patient, a Chinese medicine practitioner herself, explained that not every acupuncturist is capable of such results. It is necessary to find the one who can, just as you would a Western doctor. Do not be discouraged by this trial by error. Every time you visit a medical practitioner, you are learning what kind of physician suits you and helps you the most.

Old Chinese book, from aliexpress.com

Old Chinese book, from aliexpress.com

“Acupuncture and herbs are only one aspect of a treatment. To truly heal, one needs to resonate with their clients. The client too needs to have confidence that one can overcome the illness or else the spirit will scatter. Temper one’s emotions or else the illness cannot be treated.” (Yellow Emperor’s Classic, Sù Wèn, Chapter 14)

In other words, “It did not work,” is a capitulation to illness that makes it impossible to heal. As long as we believe that we are incurable, it shall be so. We underestimate the power of the mind’s intention by entertaining such thoughts.

“A good healer cannot rely just on their knowledge and skill. One must have integrity, compassion and honesty as a responsible practitioner. … When both client-practitioner are in resonance, then the illness will no longer linger.” (Yellow Emperor’s Classic, Sù Wèn, Chapter 14)

The other reason a treatment may not work is that they are traditionally performed daily in courses of ten. In this country, the cost and time involved prohibits such frequency unless one lives in a small mountain community where everyone is close and the cost of living is lower. For stubborn issues in this country, treatment is recommended biweekly in the beginning. For every year you have had the problem, figure you will need a month of treatment. Acupuncture uses your energy to reestablish a flow in the body’s channels that helps specific areas. It is similar to reconnecting circuits on an electronic board. During the therapy you are learning how to recreate the regenerating flow. At a certain point in time your body forgets the lesson and symptoms return. This period lasts longer and longer as you master the new information. When discomfort recurs it is time to see your acupuncturist for another energetic tutoring session. Ultimately the patient needs them less and less. As Shīfu Kenny Gong said, “Good acupuncturist put himself out of business. Bad acupuncturist make plenty of money.”

Treatments usually last about 20 to 25 minutes. According to the ancient texts it takes the body’s energy and blood to make a full circuit in 22 minutes. The acupuncture therapy flows to every part of the patient in this time. Some treatments are shorter, such as for acute cold and flu symptoms, because the energy and blood only need to circulate on the surface. Deeper channels access the bones and constitution. Those sessions can last 30 minutes to an hour and they are done weekly rather than more frequently. It depends on what the patient needs at that moment in time. I ascertain this through palpation of the pulse, observation of the tongue and the patient’s complaints. “The process of healing cannot be fathomed because many variables can occur during an illness which will require constant adjustment of the treatment.” (Yellow Emperor’s Classic, Sù Wèn, Chapter 8)

It also pays to be a fast learner and that is the reason children are so easy to help. Adults are more set in their ways. They have worn certain paths in their bodies that are deep below the surface like old European roads. It is harder for them to climb out and take the route ignored for so long.

Bronze man with acupuncture channels, from manyriversacupuncture.com

Bronze man with acupuncture channels, from manyriversacupuncture.com

After your first treatment you should feel some change in your state, either better or worse. Obviously you prefer to feel improvement but the unwinding of illness from the body can sometimes be uncomfortable. If your body is blocked, it is harder to be aware of changes taking place. It is the good practitioner’s habit to acknowledge these improvements until the patient’s self-awareness develops.

Living on a mountain makes it easier to see that the sky is the limit!

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“A great woman is one who carries the child in her heart.” Mèng Zĭ

Mencius AKA Mèng Zĭ

Mencius AKA Mèng Zĭ

Being immersed in Daoism, I was inspired by the photos below. The evolution of spiritual cultivation in Daoism moves from childhood through adulthood and returns to childhood with old age. This is not an endorsement of dementia. The elder purposely develops the innocence of childhood. It is clear from their answers that children think deeply about the importance of relationships. They are nonjudgemental about the world. They know instinctively that, “the name that becomes a name is not the Immortal Name” (Lao-Tzu’s Taoteching translated by Red Pine). Under ideal circumstances they let go of trauma easily because they are not yet socialized to hold onto it. Children cry instinctively when they are hurt to wash away the pain. The sun comes out when they finally smile, ready to play again. My children attended a school where an injured child was not instantly picked up and admonished that everything was OK. Instead the youngster lay where they fell, surrounded by playmates and teachers, until she had finished processing the experience fully. Otherwise, with time, trauma accumulates in the body like the sediment in an old barrel and reduces circulation, which causes pain. For the same reason, children adapt easily to new circumstances. Youngsters have the ease of Wú Wéi. This is the idea of accomplishing everything without doing anything. The wise elder knows that this is the best way to live life: immersed in the spontaneity of the moment.

Imgur

Imgur

Mrrozzyroo

Mrrozzyroo

Clive White

Clive White

Meh.ro

Meh.ro

http://www.playmountain.org/

For more pictures see the link below:
http://www.viralnova.com/awesome-kid-answers/#rK1JfSsxl40Yf5kF.01

The Elder

The Elder

Iwihinmu, 'place of mystery', from localhikes.com

Iwihinmu, ‘place of mystery’, from localhikes.com

Spring has sprung on the mountain. The buds have crept up the valleys to our high perch. The snow is melting from the bald top of Iwihinmu. In the Chumash language, the mountain’s name means place of mystery. In a normal year the snowpack might last until June or July. The days are warm. When the wind blows, snow flies upward. It is a flurry of furry seed clumps floating from their mother plants into the sky. The Steller’s Jays are building a nest with pine needles under the peak of our A-frame. They have decided that our proximity in the baby blue Adirondacks is still conducive to chickrearing. The needles are scattered everywhere; they are not tidy builders.

Spring greens, dandelion is cold, good for a frustrated liver.

Spring greens, dandelion is cold, good for a frustrated liver.

The new growth of spring reminds us of the mandate to care for the living things around us. The Yellow Emperor’s Classic says spring is the time of reward rather than punishment, building rather than tearing down. In this culture we think of spring-cleaning to provide a clean slate for the rest of the year. How else to create a space for health, wealth and prosperity in our lives? Prosperity is the luxury of a surplus we can share with others. Cleansing your body is equivalent to tidying your environment; it is called detoxification. It is how we reduce inflammation. Do not pick up the brooms and mops if you are still tired from the winter, keep resting.

Food is the best medicine.

Food is the best medicine.

Chinese medicine considers food the most sophisticated medicine. If you eat according to your biochemical individuality, your digestion is healthy. Imagine tending crops that you know flourish in the soil of your bowels. Unfortunately our minds rather than our guts dictate our diets. Bring awareness to your eating. Consume at least one meal without any distractions such as television or thinking. You will lose unwanted weight this way. Eating becomes a meditation where you focus on the texture, aroma and flavour of your food. It is an intimate experience to ingest anything into your body. Eating anything you want without distractions gives you time to consider your motives. You may not need the foods incompatible to your system anymore, once you understand your reasons for consuming them.

Drink beverages at least 30 to 60 minutes before or after eating. This prevents fluids from diluting digestive juices. Eat when you are hungry not tired. Food gives us energy but a short nap or early bedtime is the real solution to fatigue. Eat until you feel satisfied, not full. If you feel hungry after a standard meal, wait ten minutes before you decide to have more. For some of us it takes a little time to register satisfaction. Insatiable hunger indicates some discontentment with your life. Look inward at the self rather than outward at food for the solution.

The green shoots of spring remind us to eat dark leafy greens. Consume at least 2 ½ cups of vegetables daily to keep the large intestine moving smoothly. I recommend a modified Dr. Bieler’s Health Broth at one or two meals, depending on the frequency of your bowel movements: once daily or after each meal is normal. It is known colloquially as Poop Soup.

Zucchini, from wrensoft.com

Zucchini, from wrensoft.com

Green beans, from buffalo-niagaragardening.com

Green beans, from buffalo-niagaragardening.com

Italian parsley, from gpb.org

Italian parsley, from gpb.org

Bring to a boil and simmer in a small amount of water equal amounts of:

· zucchini (high in calcium, strengthens the digestion and the kidneys)
· string beans (strengthens the digestion and the kidneys, drains damp)
· Italian or regular parsley (detoxifies the blood, calms the spirit, increases satisfaction with life)

Cook until still emerald green rather than dark green. Blend twice in a mixer for a smooth broth (less water makes a delicious thick soup). Make a large amount and freeze it. If you tend to be cold add some chopped ginger. If you tend to be hot add some pre-soaked wakame seaweed. You can also add any other dark leafy greens you prefer. One of my patients hates the taste of parsley so he leaves that out, adding something else. Another patient eats nothing but Bieler’s Broth when she is sick and it shortens her recovery. Dark leafy greens relax the liver. Spring is the season of the liver. Like a healthy mother who gets everything done without stress, the liver achieves the most when it is calm. Spring teaches us maternal nurturing.

Mother and cub curled up, from bear.com

Mother and cub curled up, from bear.com

It is all well and good to recommend getting more sleep but what about those of us with insomnia? Until recently I have woken at 4 am every morning. Needless to say I ran out of steam at around 2 pm every afternoon. I credit mountain living with eventually helping me to sleep until 7 am. A major benefit of country life is the lack of light at night. This is not just a boon for stargazers but for insomniacs too.

Chinese medicine uses nature as its template for health. The twenty-four hour day has a specific circuit that begins when our eyes open in the morning. Western science has a name for the body’s twenty-four hour clock: the circadian rhythm. Similar to Eastern ideas, the eyes relay the time of day to a clock in the brain. The biological clock coordinates sleep, wakefulness, body temperature, thirst and appetite. Without artificial light, the sun leaves our eyes at nightfall and our eyelids close for sleep. On Pine Mountain I call it permanent camping, once the sun goes down I crawl into my ‘tent’ AKA my bedroom. After twelve hours of wakefulness it is time for your body to wind down and prepare for sleep. It is this dedication to rest and the natural darkness of my surroundings that restored my sleep cycle. Those of you having trouble falling asleep should keep light sources in the house down to a minimum at night. Avoid backlit technology such as computers and televisions after sunset. Save that kind of work or entertainment for the daytime. Record Jimmy Fallon! Reading a book with a single light in the ambiance of a naturally dark home is a better choice. Black-out blinds or curtains keep the light pollution out of our bedrooms. I am sensitive to the power lights on electronics and cover them too. To be perfectly honest, my husband has been having a hard time finding that darned pea under his princess’s mattress. He also has difficulty finding his way to the bathroom because it is so dark (speaking of pee).

Sleepy eyes, from bear.com

Sleepy eyes, from bear.com

Go to sleep when you feel tired. A fatigued person who forces their energy to rise for too long past a certain point cannot sleep. The energy that should be sinking into the organs loses its way in the bustle of mental activity. Do not hold your eyelids open despite their overwhelming desire to close. If this happens during the day, and you have the luxury, take a 20 to 30 minute nap. Any more and the twenty-four hour cycle gets reset and some organs lose their turn for refreshment. Have you had the experience of waking from a long nap and feeling even more tired? This is the circuit restarting itself as if it was morning again.

Fast asleep with a blanket of snow, from bear.com

Fast asleep with a blanket of snow, from bear.com

According to the sages, some bedtimes are better than others! When our eyes shut for sleep at night, energy starts to circulate into the deep parts of the body for repairs and maintenance. My martial arts teacher, Shīfù Kenny Gong, used to say, “No fix bicycle while riding it!” Each organ receives a dispensation of energy for two hours before the cycle moves on to the next one. The best time to turn in is between 9 and 10 pm. At that time the liver starts to receive its share of attention. The liver is so active that it produces most of our heat. Going to sleep between these hours is your assurance that the hardest working organ in your body gets its well-deserved rest. And I bet you thought it was your brain! Sweet dreams!

The liver in a Chinese woodcut from the Ming (1368-1644 CE), from wellcomeimages.org

The liver in a Chinese woodcut from the Ming (1368-1644 CE), from wellcomeimages.org

The next installment will have advice for those of you who wake up at night and have trouble falling asleep.

One casualty, one survivor, who is to say what is better?

One casualty, one survivor, who is to say what is better?

Everybody on the mountain knows wind makes things dry. This is the high desert after all. Without humidity, wind creates a parched heat like the one we had near the end of January. Normally wind is associated with spring and humidity. This is the typical seasonal weather. A hot wind in winter is untimely. Winter should be a period of cold and hibernation. Wind prunes trees. Wind is change, the new beginning of spring or the new day, opening our eyes first thing in the morning. Wind reminds us that we can be different. Movement starts to increase in our environment as the New Year approaches and days lengthen. The wooden horse of this year is overtaking the slowness of last year’s water snake. Wood nourishes fire. The horse is fire. This year will be fast, like a well-nourished horse. It will be the opposite of 2013, unless of course you live in mountain time.

Chinese Year of the Wood Horse, stone rubbing

Chinese Year of the Wood Horse, stone rubbing

The only permanence in life is change. Most of us live in the belief that life is better static rather than plastic. The wind’s movement creates adaptation in our bodies. The climate and seasons remind us that nothing stays the same, including ourselves. In the West we have a term for the belief that nature portends human events. It is called pathetic fallacy. In Chinese philosophy, the connection we have with nature is neither pitiful nor untrue. It gives us clues as to how our own physiology operates. The Yellow Emperor’s Classic of Internal Medicine says that wind is the origin of many diseases. We are prone to illness when we forget the importance of change: the modification of our behaviour depending on the environment and our circumstances from moment to moment. Live in the light of your own authenticity. This is the lesson of spring.

Fēng meaning wind, a pathogen has entered the inner sanctum.

Fēng meaning wind, a pathogen has entered the inner sanctum.

The pathogen ie bacteria, viruses, fungae.

Chōng, the pathogen ie bacteria, viruses, fungae.

The inner sanctum ie the body.

Fán,the inner sanctum ie the body.

Let the tender shoots of new growth develop without worry. This includes your own comfort with personal change. The green sprout should not be pulled up to check its roots. The gardener trusts its process. It is the same with the changes you undergo in spring, in the morning and anytime you begin something new. Nourishing the kidney in the winter soldifies this trust. If you missed the boat and did not hibernate this winter, there is always next year. We get lots of opportunities to grow no matter the season or our age.

IMG_0459

If you have trouble relaxing into change during spring, it helps to eat more steamed dark leafy greens. These vegetables are full of magnesium, which relaxes muscles, including the bowels. If you are taking blood thinners, discuss eating these vegetables with your doctor first. Your medication may need to be adjusted if you eat them. Otherwise the Yellow Emperor recommends letting your hair down and walking in the grass barefoot. He says we should go to bed with the sun and wake early. Spring is about the love of the mother for the infant. New growth requires softness.